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White Flower Delivery

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White Flower Delivery
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Whether you're sending white flowers to commemorate a special occasion like a wedding, a baby shower, or a graduation, or you want to convey sympathy for the passing of a loved one, the best way to send your message is with a white flower delivery. Same-day delivery service will ensure that all your white blooms arrive in a state of pristine perfection.

White Flower FAQ

When is it appropriate to give white flowers?

White flowers are the perfect gift for any occasion that requires a level of thoughtful reverence. Most often linked to weddings and funerals, white flowers can be used to symbolize new beginnings, as with weddings, baby showers, christenings, graduations, and so on, or they could be used as condolence & bereavement flowers to honor those who are no longer present. White roses, in particular, are connected with the notion of pure love, which is why they are the bridal flower. However, they are also great for anniversaries.

Do white flowers have different meanings in different cultures?

In Western culture, dating back at least as far as ancient Greece, white flowers were thought to act as symbols of purity, faith, and illumination. Perhaps this is why they are so often seen in religious ceremonies, particularly weddings and christenings, for example. Eastern cultures, or more specifically, Asian cultures, associate the color white with death and the afterlife, which is why white flowers are common at funerals - a tradition that has also been adopted in the west. In eastern cultures, it's a major faux pas to bring white blooms to a wedding or other celebratory event.

Bushes, Shrubs & Plants with White Flowers

  • Gardenia: Gardenias are known for their luscious, white blooms, their intensely sweet fragrance, and unfortunately, their finicky nature. They need a lot of bright, but not direct, sunlight, scads of humidity, controlled temperatures, and plenty of food. With proper care, you'll enjoy the coiled blooms and the syrupy aroma these flowers are famous for.

  • Lilac: Better known for purple blossoms, the lilac bush nonetheless comes in a variety of shades, including white. If you want the sweet scent of lilacs in the spring, paired with the appeal of pure, white blooms, you can have the best of both worlds with white lilacs, which are stunning alone or in a bouquet featuring purple shades, as well.

The Meaning of White Flowers

White flowers are used for weddings and funerals alike, mainly because they are thought to symbolize purity and perfection, the states most often associated with sacred events like marriage and remembrance of those who have passed on. Different cultures have different associations with the color white, which is why it could symbolize both the new beginning of marriage and the ending of life. Either way, there is no denying the stark significance of pure, white blossoms. They are often seen as a symbol of faith or even a mark of innocence, which is why they denote a certain level of reverence. In terms of white roses, they are most often seen as the bridal flower, at least in western cultures, but they can also be used honor the dead.

Fragrant White Flowers

  • Roses: There is no shortage of white blooms that deliver a powerful dollop of fragrance, but one of the most recognizable is the rose. Interestingly, white roses tend to have a subtler scent than their red or pink counterparts, with notes of lemon and violets highlighting the classic rose aroma.

  • Jasmine: Few flowers can rival the satisfyingly sweet fragrance of jasmine, which is sugary treat for the olfactory senses. The exotic, intoxicating scent of jasmine is as good as eating rich, chocolate cake, which is probably why it is considered one of the best-smelling flowers of any hue. It is used in perfumes, cosmetics, aromatherapy, and even teas, but there is nothing to compare to a whiff of night-blooming jasmine on a sweltering summer night.